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Posts tagged ‘OSHA’

OSHA’s Updated Rule on Fall Protection

Slip, trip, and fall hazards are some of the leading causes of worker deaths and injuries, and the most commonly cited OSHA violation (see the other nine most cited OSHA violations here). In order to address this important component of worker safety, OSHA has released a final rule updating its general industry Walking-Working Surfaces standards specific to slip, trip, and fall hazards. Here is OSHA’s summary of the rule – see here for the complete final rule.

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OSHA’s Top Ten Most Cited Violations

 

As we bring in the new year, many of us are thinking of our resolutions for 2017 – and OSHA is giving us a hand with the yearly release of the Top 10 Most Cited Safety Violations in 2016. Make setting safety goals and creating hazard-free workplaces a top priority while working to avoid these oft-cited violations – the first of which has been #1 for the past 6 years.

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Tyndale at OSHA’s Oil and Gas Conference 2016

Tyndale attended OSHA’s biennial Oil and Gas Safety Conference last month, held in Houston from November 29-30th. This sold-out conference attracted a crowd of more than 1,000 industry professionals, and offered attendees the opportunity to hear keynote addresses from safety industry experts, and engage in breakout sessions and exhibitions with peers and colleagues. Read more

Saving on FRC by Eliminating Retail Spend

This is the third in a five-part series exploring common examples of ineffective FRC practices that have real costs—and practical solutions. So far, we reviewed common scenarios that signify opportunities for savings, and reducing costs by transitioning out of rental or lease. In this post, we review the impact of eliminating retail spend, and in our next posts we will examine two additional cost saving strategies: streamlining procurement procedures and spend avoidance.

Although on the surface retail purchases seem like an easy solution for quickly outfitting workers with flame resistant clothing (FRC), convenience comes at a high cost for employers. In fact, retail purchases pose several significant challenges—and risks:

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Who is Responsible for FRC Use, Care, and Maintenance?

What do industry standards say about flame resistant clothing (FRC) use, care, and maintenance in oil and gas applications? And who is responsible for making sure garments meet those expectations? What tools are available to employers to support compliance with the requirements?  In this blog post, we explore and compare and contrast applicable industry standards governing the use and care of FRC.

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Tyndale’s Top 10 Blog Posts of 2015

 

We hope your new year is off to a great start! Updates to OSHA 1910.269 were among the most popular posts – including our four-part series which is fully represented within the top 10 posts of 2015!  Here’s a look back at our top 10 most-viewed posts in 2015: Read more

Tyndale’s Step by Step Guide to 1910.269 Compliance for Contractors

In April 2014, OSHA issued a ruling that clarified and expanded employers’ responsibility to protect employees from arc flash hazards.  This ruling – 29 CFR 1910.269 and 1926 subpart V, standards governing workplace safety in electric power generation, transmission and distribution work – has been enforced since August 31, 2015.

Not sure if your employees are protected under final federal rule 1910.269? Tyndale can help! Tyndale is dedicated to protecting workers by helping contractors understand and gain compliance with the new requirements of OSHA’s final rule. Read more