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Posts tagged ‘industrial laundry’

How to Save on FRC by Transitioning Away From Rental

This is the second in a five-part series exploring common examples of ineffective FRC practices that have real costs—and practical solutions. In our first post we reviewed common scenarios that signify opportunity for savings. In this post, we explore how to realize savings by transitioning out of rental or lease, and in our next posts we will examine three additional cost saving strategies: eliminating retail spend, streamlining procurement procedures, and spend avoidance.

As organizations look to reduce costs – either as part of an industry downturn, or simply to streamline procurement – transitioning out of rental/lease for flame resistant clothing (FRC) can help companies realize as much as 30-50% or more in direct cost savings! In fact, by transitioning from a rental program to a Tyndale managed direct purchase program, Stallion Oilfield Services cut spending by more than 50%!

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Frustrated with FRC Rental? Hybrid to the Rescue!

The problem:

Workers frustrated with industrial laundry no longer turn-in their garments each week — but you’re still paying the same weekly price for the service.  You still need industrial laundry because some workgroups are exposed to heavy soils or flammable contaminants that are difficult to remove in home laundry.

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Why Leasing FR Clothing is Not as Simple as Leasing a Car

If you’ve been tasked with researching FR clothing solutions for your company, you have likely run across industrial laundry programs in your research. Maybe you’ve even received direction from above to pursue an industrial laundry program.

What many people don’t realize is that most industrial laundry programs utilize an unusual ownership arrangement.  Laundry programs – often called “rental” or “lease and laundry” programs – utilize an ownership arrangement similar to an auto lease.  In both arrangements,

  • The vendor owns the uniforms or auto, and the buyer enjoys the benefits of their use.
  • At the end of the lease, the uniforms or auto must be returned to the vendor in good condition.

It sounds simple on the surface, but in reality leasing clothing is anything but simple.

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Training Video: FRC Care, Maintenance and Inspection

While many see OSHA’s update to standard 1910.269 as something that only affects the electric utility industry, OSHA’s changes are far greater reaching than many people may expect. In fact, the Preamble to OSHA’s recently updated standard 1910.269 ruling gives insight on the agency’s stance on proper care and maintenance of PPE in general. Key messages in 1910.269 are relevant to the oil and gas industries and other industries that use arc/flame resistant (FR) clothing to protect workers from arc flash or flash fire hazards.

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Do New OSHA 1910.269 PPE Rules Impact Oil, Gas, and Other Industries?

OSHA’s recent 1910.269 ruling for the electric utility industry defines FR clothing as PPE–similar to 2010’s OSHA 1910.132 Enforcement Policy Memo regarding protection from flash fire in oil and gas well drilling, servicing, and production-related operations. In fact, the Preamble to the recent 1910.269 ruling introduces additional commentary from OSHA that paints a broader picture of the agency’s stance on proper care and maintenance of PPE in general. As a result, key messages in 1910.269 are relevant to the oil and gas industries and other industries that use arc/flame resistant (FR) clothing to protect workers from arc flash or flash fire hazards.

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