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Posts from the ‘OSHA 1910.269’ Category

Tyndale’s Top 10 Blog Posts of 2015

 

We hope your new year is off to a great start! Updates to OSHA 1910.269 were among the most popular posts – including our four-part series which is fully represented within the top 10 posts of 2015!  Here’s a look back at our top 10 most-viewed posts in 2015: Read more

Tyndale’s Step by Step Guide to 1910.269 Compliance for Contractors

In April 2014, OSHA issued a ruling that clarified and expanded employers’ responsibility to protect employees from arc flash hazards.  This ruling – 29 CFR 1910.269 and 1926 subpart V, standards governing workplace safety in electric power generation, transmission and distribution work – has been enforced since August 31, 2015.

Not sure if your employees are protected under final federal rule 1910.269? Tyndale can help! Tyndale is dedicated to protecting workers by helping contractors understand and gain compliance with the new requirements of OSHA’s final rule. Read more

What Are Today’s Advanced FR Rainwear Options?

This is the second post in a three-part series reviewing the 2015-16 El Niño outlook and arc-rated flame resistant rainwear options available to outdoor workers facing arc flash or flash fire hazards. In this post we explore advanced rainwear options, while in our next post we feature some cost-effective rainwear solutions that are tried and true.

As we have seen in our first post, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predictions show that the 2015 El Niño may be unusually strong and is likely to last through winter 2015 into spring 2016.

Luckily, recent advancements in arc-rated flame resistant (FR) rainwear have made it easier than ever to avoid the dangers of heat and cold stress and manage perspiration—without compromising on safety and compliance. Tyndale is a proud distributor of the latest in FR rainwear technology:

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Tyndale’s Top Blog Posts of 2015 To Date

 

We’ve rounded up our most-viewed blog post so far this year for your reading pleasure. Don’t forget to check out our blog regularly for new content – we’re your one-stop resource for everything related to the flame resistant clothing industry. Read more

Hugh Hoagland Addresses Comfort & Contamination in FRC

Although many utility employers began providing arc-rated clothing well before the new OSHA 1910.269, those who are now installing arc-rated clothing programs may face questions and sometimes friction from workers who are accustomed to wearing non-FR on the job.

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What Does 1910.269 Say About Socks and Underwear?

OSHA’s 2014 1910.269 ruling marks a distinct departure from its predecessor. In fact, up until the new rule was promulgated, 1910.269 simply required that clothing “do no harm” in the event of an arc flash. In stark contrast, the 2014 ruling specifically requires employers to provide arc/flame resistant (FR) clothing for employees.

Employers must now make sure “each employee who is exposed to hazards from flames or electric arcs does not wear clothing that could melt onto his or her skin or that could ignite and continue to burn when exposed to flames or the heat energy estimated” (Paragraph (l)(8)(iii) of 29 CFR 1910.269).

While the updates made to OSHA 1910.269 are generally regarded as much-needed improvements to worker safety and are expected to save dozens of lives each year, the ruling also sparked some new questions.

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Tyndale’s Top Five OSHA 1910.269 Blog Posts

Since OSHA promulgated the new 1910.269 in April 2014, Tyndale has been hard at work partnering with employers to understand and gain compliance with the new provisions—helping workers return home to their families safely each night.

Join thousands of readers in taking advantage of our top five OSHA 1910.269 blog posts:

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