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Posts tagged ‘personal protective equipment (PPE)’

Tyndale in ISHN Magazine: Steps to Comply with 1910.269

OSHA’s 2014 updates to 29 CFR 1910.269 are generally embraced as much-needed measures to better protect the men and women who work on or near electric power lines. Read Tyndale’s article featured on page 44 of the July 2014 issue of Industrial Safety & Hygiene News Magazine (ISHN) for four important next steps employers should take prompt action to accomplish now that the OSHA 1910.269 final rule has been published.

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Quiz: Test Your Compliance Readiness with OSHA 1910.269

In April, OSHA updated standard 29 CFR 1910.269 and 1926 subpart V to clarify and expand the employer’s responsibility to better protect employees working on or near electrical power lines. With this update, it is now the responsibility of employers to comply with the new requirements as they relate to flame resistant and arc-rated clothing.

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How Disposable Coveralls Extend the Life of Your FRC

We all know that FR clothing provides protection from arc flash and flash fire hazards. However, situations where your primary FR clothing may become heavily soaked in oil or covered in excessive dirt may cause unsafe conditions in which your primary FR clothing should no longer be worn. Disposable FR coveralls provide cost-effective protection that preserve the useful life of a worker’s primary FR. This ensures that the FRC will perform as expected in the event of an arc flash or flash fire incident.

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OSHA 1910.269: Why Industrial Laundry is Not the Answer

Under the new 1910.269 and 1926 subpart V ruling, OSHA clarified its stance that FR and arc-rated clothing should reasonably and appropriately be treated as Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). This designation reinforces the employer’s legal obligation to provide, pay for, and retain ultimate responsibility for care and maintenance of FR and arc-rated clothing.

When considering strategies to comply with the new care and maintenance requirements, consider the facts: Read more

6 Critical Changes to OSHA 1910.269 Regarding FRC

On April 11, 2014, OSHA published to the Federal Register the final rule revising 29 CFR 1910.269 and 1926 Subpart V, related to the construction and repair of electric power generation, transmission and distribution in an effort to improve workplace safety. This recent change to OSHA 1910.269 updates the standard providing electrical safety guidance for those in the operation and maintenance of electrical power.

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Coming Soon: Permethrin-Treated FRC for Bug Bite Protection

We’ve covered the dangers of using DEET-based insect repellent while wearing FR, and why you should apply permethrin to clothing instead. While FR clothing is considered the “last line of defense” in the event of an arc flash or flash fire incident, insect repellent is often the “first line of defense” against ticks and other blood-feeding, disease-carrying insects.

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What Is the Difference Between Inherent and Treated FR?

“Inherent” and “treated” are the two terms used most to distinguish between FR fabrics. The difference between treated and inherently flame resistant fabrics relates to the process used in making the final product flame resistant (1).

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